Dr. King, Jess

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Dr. King, Jess

Lecturer

My research interests lie mostly in classic geology, both structural and petrological, with application to tectonic evolution of continental collision zones - the Himalayan & Alpine orogen in particular. I received BSc(hons) in Geology from Edinburgh University in 2003, with final dissertation on nappe formation in the Austrian Alps, and  followed with my PhD in 2007 from the Open University, UK, Thesis title ‘Crustal melting beneath southern Tibet’. My research field still follows continental collisional tectonics where I specialize in geochemistry and geochronology of crustal anatexis and high grade metamorphism, with a view to understanding mid to deep crustal behavior, particularly the role of crustal melting, during orogenesis

Email:
Tel:
Location:
jessking@hku.hk
2241 5473
JL403B
 

Teaching

EASC1402    Principles of geology
EASC3403    Sedimentary environments
EASC4955    Integrated field studies
CCST9019    Understanding Climate Change
CCST9023    The Oceans, Science and Society
GEOS8021    Geological Fieldwork II
GEOS8215    Sedimentology

Selected Publications

  1. Shah Faisal, Kyle P. Larson, Jess King, John M. Cottle. 2015. Rifting, subduction and collisional records from pluton petrogenesis and geochronology in the Hindu Kush, NW Pakistan: GONDWANA RESEARCH · online 26 JUNE 2015, DOI: 10.1016/j.gr.2015.05.014 
  2. A.R. Heri, J.C. Aitchison, J.A. King, I.M. Villa: Geochronology and isotope geochemistry of Eocene dykes intruding the Ladakh Batholith: Lithos Volumes 212–215, January 2015, Pages 111–121
  3. King, J. A., Harris, N., Argles, T., and Parrish, R. R., 2011, The contribution of crustal anatexis to the tectonic evolution of Indian crust beneath Southern Tibet: Geological Society of America Bulletin, January 2011, v. 123, no. 1-2, p. 218-239, First published online October 8, 2010, doi: 10.1130/B30085.1
  4. King, J. A., Harris, N., Argles, T., Parrish, R. R., Charlier, B. L. A., Sherlock, S., and Zhang, H., 2007, First field evidence of southward ductile flow of Asian crust beneath southern Tibet: Geology, v. 35, no. 8, p. 727-730.
  5. Zhang, H., Harris, N., Parrish, R., Kelley, S., Zhang, L., Rogers, N., Argles, T., and King, J., 2004, Causes and consequences of protracted melting of the mid-crust exposed in the North Himalayan antiform: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v. 228, p. 195-212.